Scottish regiments ww1 records

scottish regiments ww1 records

Thirty-five Royal Scots battalions served at various stages during the course of the 1st World War. The Regular Army component, consisting of two active service and one reserve battalions, served throughout the war. The seven Territorial battalions that were in being at the beginning of the war all saw some active service. Furthermore the Territorial units all raised additional battalions for greater or lesser periods of service.

Eight New Army battalions were raised during the war. Two of these were raised as reserve battalions but the remaining six all served on the Western Front. Finally three special units were raised, the 19th Labour Battalion and the 1st and 2nd Garrison Battalions. In India at the outbreak of war. Arrived in England in November and moved to France in December. Served on the Western Front until November when it transferred to Salonika. Served in the Balkans for the remainder of the war.

Moved to Russian Georgia for operations against the Bolshevists in December Returned to Edinburgh in May At Plymouth at the outbreak of war. Moved to France in August and served on the Western Front throughout the war. Returned to Scotland in At Glencorse at the outbreak of war and moved to Weymouth in August Returned to Glencorse in May where it remained until late when it moved to Mullingar in Ireland.

In May it moved to Maryhill Barracks in Glasgow before the majority of its manpower was subsumed into the 1st and 2nd Battalions.

Mobilised in Edinburgh in August Moved to Gallipoli in June Transferred to Egypt in January and served there, and in Palestine, until April Served on the Western Front from April until the end of the war. Reduced to cadre strength in March and returned home in May Raised in Edinburgh in September Disbanded in July Raised in Peebles in May It spent the next twelve months in Galashiels, Loanhead and Hawick training drafts for service overseas.

In July it was absorbed into the new 4th Reserve Battalion. In February it was moved to Glasgow where it disbanded later that year. Mobilised in Edinburgh in August and initially employed on coastal defence duties in Scotland.Coldstream is in Scotland, does that mean they are ours as well?

Coldstream Guards, a regiment which derives its name from the little Border town in Berwickshire, where it was formed by General Monck in from two of Cromwell's regiments. Later the name of the 2nd Cold-stream Foot Guards was adopted. I wanted to know if I had all the cap badges so I could mount them in a frame.

I didn't start the issue of Coldstream Guards being Scottish or not. When someone added that the Coldstream guards were Scottish I had to ask if they were or not as I didn't want to miss them out. I was not the one who said that it was Scottish but Berwick was English and so on. I hope that explains what I was after, and I am still non the wiser if the Coldstream guards were English formed in a Scottish village or are Scottish because they were formed in a Scottish village.

I have hit my head against the wall a good few times now and about to place my head in the oven. Maybe you can clarify all the Scottish regiments who served during WW1 as I will take your list as gospel. Being that forum rules state that I should keep things in the right places I started this post in medals etc.

The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

I think you have them all listed now, once you add the Yeomanry ones. Coldstream Guards are never counted as Scots. Cheers Chris, I only wanted the Scottish regiments it was others who added the English ones with Scottish connections. I hesitate to say that my Grandfather was a Welshman, served for a time as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Welch Rgt before the war, but when war broke out he was returning to the UK and the first recruiting office he found was for the Lovat Scouts.

Despite being Welsh he fought with the Lovats at Gallipoli rising through the ranks from Private finishing as Lieutenant at the end of You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Paste as plain text instead. Only 75 emoji are allowed. Display as a link instead. Clear editor. Upload or insert images from URL. Reply to this topic Start new topic.The 91st Foot later 1st Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders were guarding one of the flanks and did not take part in the fighting. The Gordon Highlanders arrived days after the capture of the main Russian fortifications at Sebastapol.

The Edinburgh-raised 99th Lanarkshire Regiment and the 94th Regiment, raised in Glasgow, also served against the Zulus but were shortly afterwards stripped of their Scottish associations to become battalions of the Wiltshire Regiment and the Connaught Rangers.

Loudon's Highlanders, disbanded inwere also present. The last six regiments named were all disbanded at the end of the war. Scotland's only regular cavalry regiment. They trace their origins back to troops of horsemen raised in as the Royal Regiment of Scotch Dragoons to hunt down strict Presbyterians who revolted against attempts to impose an English-style church in Scotland.

The regiment was also distinguished by being the only cavalry one to wear bearskin headgear. The regimental headquarters is at Edinburgh Castle. The Carabiniers had recruited in Cheshire and North Wales.

Scottish regiment

The officers' reputed fondness for champagne in times past once led to the regiment being nicknamed the "Bubbly Jocks". The Scots Guards claim descent from a regiment raised in by the Duke of Argyll for service in Ireland.

In it had twice as many Englishmen as Scotsmen in its ranks. The regiment recruits from throughout Scotland but still includes a large contingent of Englishmen.

The regimental headquarters is in London but the regiment is presently based at Aldershot. The oldest line infantry regiment in the British Army. The unit claims descent from the Scottish mercenaries who served the Kings of France. It lineage can safely to be traced back to Hepburn's Regiment which fought for the Swedes in It was authorised as a British regiment in and lent to the French. When the British decided to number their regiments rather than identify them by the names of their colonels, the Royal Scots were named the 1st Foot.

When regimental recruiting areas were assigned inthe Royal Scots were given Edinburgh and the Lothians; the depot was in Edinburgh. The re-organisation of saw the regimented kitted out in Black watch tartan trews. The tartan was changed in to Hunting Stewart. All the battalions of The Royal Regiment of Scotland are kilted. Members of 1 Scots wear a black hackle on their Tam o'Shanters. Fusilier regiments were usually assigned to protect artillery guns.

Five years later it became a Royal regiment and adopted the name Royal Scots Fusiliers in In it was assigned Ayrshire and Galloway as its recruiting ground and the regimental depot was at Ayr. In the regiment was wearing Government tartan with a dark blue overstripe. This changed in to Hunting Erskine tartan.The Cameronians were the only regiment of rifles in the Scottish infantry and were formed during the political and religious turmoil of the 17th century.

They were involved in conflicts throughout the world during World War I. Many regiments have their own marches which were traditionally used to rally the troops and boost morale before battle. Both battalions were posted to the Western Front in and remained there throughout the war. The regiment raised an additional 25 battalions from the Reserve, Territorial and New armies over the course of the conflict.

They saw action in France, Belgium, Gallipoli, Egypt, Salonika and at various home stations, receiving a total of 27 battle honours. Over 7, men of the regiment lost their lives with several awarded the Victoria Cross.

Discover more at Low Parks Museum.

scottish regiments ww1 records

VisitScotland uses cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By using our website you consent to our use of cookies. Please read our privacy and cookies statement for more information. Low Parks Museum, Hamilton.

The 1st Battalion was unofficially known as 'the Cameronians', while the 2nd Battalion was known as 'the Scottish Rifles'. Together they served in the Second Boer War. Their roots can be traced back to the s, when they were called the Cameronian Guard. It took its name from the Cameronians, followers of Richard Cameron, a minister and leader in the Covenanter movement.

He declared war on King Charles II after the king tried to remove Presbyterian ministers from the Church of Scotland for refusing to accept the rule of the bishops. Did you know?

scottish regiments ww1 records

Facts and figures Marches Many regiments have their own marches which were traditionally used to rally the troops and boost morale before battle. It was tradition for every new member of the regiment to be issued a bible. This was in tribute to Richard Cameron, the Presbyterian minister after whom the regiment was named.

Cookie Policy. I agree.Share Share on Facebook. Post to Tumblr.

scottish regiments ww1 records

Pin it. Submit to Reddit. Share on LinkedIn. Publish on WordPress. Send via Email. The Royal Scots Fusiliers history dates back to when it was raised by Charles Erskine, de jure 5th Earl of Mar de jure indicates the earldom fell into dispute with the crown after Alexander Stewart forcibly captured and married Isabel Douglas, the Countess of Mar in The Regiment saw its first action in at the Battle of Bothwell Bridge when it helped to put down the Covenanter Rebellion which formed following the restoration of King Charles II.

Presbyterian ministers who refused to accept the rule of bishops were ejected from their parishes by the crown and took up arms in rebellion.

Charles II died suddenly in and was succeeded by his unpopular brother James II who was quickly plunged into suppressing mounting discontent, during the Monmouth rebellion of The Regiment was once again involved in action on the home front inwhen Bonnie Prince Charlie the grandson of James II attempted to regain the lost crown to the Stuart family by raising the Scottish clans into rebellion and fought at the Battle of Culloden.

In the Regimental namely system was simplified with each assigned a ranked number, therefore the Regiment became The 21st Royal North British Fusiliers. The 21st was deployed to the West Indies during the French Revolutionary Wars — where it captured the important French trading Islands of Martinique and Guadalupe. The Regiment also served during The Alexandria expedition of briefly capturing Alexandria from the Ottoman-French allegiance.

Following the defeat of Napoleon the Regiment was dispatched to America to curb the expansionist ambitions of the United States, which tried to annex Canada during the war of The War was a month military conflict between the United States and the British Empire, resolving many of the remaining issues of the American War of Independence.

The Regiment fought at the Battle of Bladensburg, the capture of Washington and the unsuccessful attempt to capture New Orleans. The Regiment was once again dispatched to the West Indies in and remained there until suppressing rebels in the Maihaca District of Demerara. After a brief return to Britain, the 21st embarked for Australia in guarding convicts and was stationed in Tasmania, Perth and Western Australia until The 21st also served during the Crimean War — fighting at the Battles of Alma, Inkermann, the Siege of Sevastopol, and the assault on the Redan.

In The Childers Reforms restructured the British army infantry Regiments into a network of multi-battalion Regiments of two regular and two militia battalions. The Regiment managed to avoid amalgamation under these reforms unlike many other Regiments but the order of precedence was dropped to become The Royal Scots Fusiliers.Share Share on Facebook.

Post to Tumblr. Pin it. Submit to Reddit. Share on LinkedIn. Publish on WordPress. Send via Email. Due to the Royal Warrant the Regiment remained part of the British standing Army and could be recalled to Britain at any time.

Britain was plunged into Civil War from until when Charles I lost his head and the Commonwealth of England was declared. After the first elections in 20 years, Parliament was reformed and proclaimed Charles II as King and invited him to return to England from exile in The Regiment returned to France for two more periods —66 and —78 and saw English service again during the Second Anglo-Dutch War fighting at the Dutch Raid on the Medway.

Royal Scots Fusiliers Memorial. Ayr Scotland

It was not until when the regiment was finally a permanent part of the English establishment. Unfortunately Tangier had been a contested territory between Morocco and Portugal for years and in the Moroccans increased their military pressure in the region. It eventually proved too expensive to keep Tangier and it was abandoned in Charles II died suddenly in and was succeeded by his unpopular brother James II who was quickly plunged into suppressing mounting discontent, during the Monmouth rebellion of James II would only manage to retain the throne for three years before being deposed by his brother-in-law William III.

In the Regimental naming system was simplified with each Regiment assigned a number rank instead of naming after their current colonel therefore the Regiment became the First Regiment of Foot. Disease was the biggest killer in the West Indies at this time, over 40, British men were lost between andthe Regiment alone lost over men during these three years. The Regiment was expanded to four battalions during the Napoleonic Wars —which meant the Regiment was present in all the Theatres of War at the time; this included the Americas, Egypt, the West Indies and India as well as Europe.

The Regiment also served during the Second Boer Warmostly as a mobile unit patrolling and raiding and during two World Wars. See more historic documents related to Royal Scots Rooney I went into the Army at the Royal Scots Training Depot Dreghorn Barracks near Edinburgh, it was December and bitterly cold that I do remember, initially I had been declared fit and was A1, now that was fine as I was keen to be a Soldier [just like my DAD during the WW1 campaign,] having endured most of the training, including the morning rush to the Mess Hall to have unsalted Porridge and inedible kippers, mindful of the 28 shillings a week, I seemed to spend most of my time at the Naafi eating eggs and chips to take away the taste of the Kippers.

More of that in the next installment. Berlin with! KOSB, spent 18 happy months again with the mortar platoon.We can search for an individual soldier or officer in the regimental Roll which will confirm surname, initials and army number. The London Scottish Regimental Gazette was a monthly magazine designed to be read by the membership of the regiment. Material included; Casualty lists, some notices of promotion or gallantry awards without citations and after the war, mentions of re-unions and some memoirs and obituaries.

More than half of the records for enlisted men were destroyed or damaged during WW2. The surviving records have been digitised and can be searched and downloaded for a fee from the National Archives website. Records for the Officers were kept in a different location and many more survived. The documents can be requested and viewed at the reading room at the National Archives here.

These are held and available for viewing at the National Archives although some have been digitised:. This volume has been digitised and is available to download for a fee here. This volume has been digitised and is available to download for a fee:. View it now. As of 01 November this war diary has not been digitised but may be viewed as an original document at the National Archives. As of 01 Novemberr this war diary has not been digitised but may be viewed as an original document at the National Archives.

It includes 20 maps, a roll of honour and an extensive index.

Unit History: Royal Scots

Not to be confused with the Official History of the same name, this slimmer volume distils the factual text of the earlier work and complements it with many images and excerpts from diaries and memoirs held in the Regimental Archive. Dolden was a solicitor who enlisted as a Private soldier in the London Scottish after the outbreak of War. Cannon Fodder is currently out of print but copies can be obtained on specialised used book web sites such as Amazon or Abe.

Pinkerton enlisted in and saw action with the 1 st Battalion in France in before being wounded and invalided out of the army. Published in the USA during the War, the purpose for writing was primarily to sway American opinion towards the Allied cause and not as a record of events. The text says more about the individual than the Regiment in which he served. Blaser was a battalion Scout and mapper so his account might be better informed than some others.

It is liberally illustrated with his own maps sketches and photographs. Link to the WW1 section. Please publish modules in offcanvas position. Looking for an individual: We can search for an individual soldier or officer in the regimental Roll which will confirm surname, initials and army number The London Scottish Regimental Gazette was a monthly magazine designed to be read by the membership of the regiment.

This is particularly good for identifying places and battles with specific dates. The London Scottish in the Great War by Mark Lloyd Pen and Sword Not to be confused with the Official History of the same name, this slimmer volume distils the factual text of the earlier work and complements it with many images and excerpts from diaries and memoirs held in the Regimental Archive.

Ladies From Hell by R. Facebook Google Plus Twitter. Privacy Policy.


thoughts on “Scottish regiments ww1 records

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *